“Baby” Rainbow Carrots

A mix of different colored carrots. There’s orange, ruby, yellow, and (going from outside in) purple-yellow-orange carrots. All very tasty.

Acorn Squash

Another squash for the centerpiece (or for noshing). 

Honeynut Squash

This variety of winter squash was bred at Cornell University and made famous by Dan Barber (chef/author of Blue Hill and The Third Plate). It’s like a butternut squash, but just concentrated down into a smaller package. Super sweet and with a deep squash flavor, they don’t need much more than a simple roast. And […]

Mutsu and SnowSweet Apples

Mutsu apples are a golden delicious cultivar, first grown in Japan. In Japan, there are three kinds typically available: Sun, Red, and Silver. Each kind differ in color based on how much sunlight they receive. These from Nichols are a pale yellow-green with red blush, almost a mix of three varieties. SnowSweets are a University […]

Parsnips

Parsnips are in the same family as carrots and parsley. Before the introduction of potatoes from the New World, parsnips were an important staple crop in Europe with the variety grown today having been developed in the Middle Ages.  Like potatoes or carrots, parsnips do well roasted. Peeling the skin can make them a little […]

Russian Blue Potatoes

The same variety of blue potatoes that we saw earlier in the season. A casserole or au gratin with these might make a fun Halloween dish. 

Redbor Dutch Kale

We saw red kale earlier in the season, but that was a different variety. This Redbor kale is thoroughly red (purple) with not even a peek of green.

Brussels Sprouts

The sprouts are starting to get larger further into the season. If you’re looking for something different, try making a slaw, thinly slicing the brussels sprouts in place of cabbage.

Fresh ginger isn’t something you’ve likely seen at the grocery store. It doesn’t have the brown papery skin typical to cured ginger. This makes it easy to peel, simply scrap off with a spoon. The greens can be used the same way as the rest of ginger, or used like green onions towards the end […]

Arugula

I love how peppery this arugula is. On a sandwich, in an omelet, or as a simple salad, it is delightful. If you don’t like the spicy zesty-ness of raw radish, you might not like raw arugula as much. In that case, try roughly chopping and sautéing it with some leek. I’m a little torn […]

Idared

Idareds are a cross between Jonathan and Wagener apples, first grown in 1791. Small in size they have a nice sweet-tart balance and hold up well when baked.

Arkansas Black

With dark crimson-red skin, Arkansas Blacks are rather large apples. They have a thicker skin and are very firm. Through storage, the color will deepen and the flavor sweeten so do not rush to eat these.

Ludacrisp

Bred by the Midwest Apple Improvement Association , Ludacrisps have a medium size with rose gold colored skin. They are tart and their flavor is tropical-fruity, almost reminiscent of Juicy Fruit gum.

Jonathan and Jonagold Apples

Jonathans are an old school apple. The origin story for it is a bit misty, but they’ve been around since at least the early 1800’s. With a relatively thicker skin, Jonathans have a nice sweet tart balance mild aromatics. Jonagolds are a cross between Golden Delicious and Jonathon bred at the New York State Experimental […]

Beauregard Sweet Potatoes

Beauregards have brick-orange skin with deep orange creamy flesh. Nichols has had one of their best Sweet Potato seasons, harvesting nearly 30,000 lbs. Sweet potatoes are first cured at 85F for 10 days, then they can be held at 60F for nearly the entire winter. The simplest way to enjoy these is by baking whole […]

Yukon Gold Potatoes

Potatoes for potato season. Yukons are a solid all-purpose potato. Use for any of your potato needs.

Red Cabbage

Earlier in the season I mentioned that receiving cabbages in shares is always nice as a rainy-day item. It will keep in the refrigerator for months, and you can always just cut a portion off the head to use, and put the rest back in the refrigerator for later (in a unsealed plastic bag). I’ll […]

Candy Onion

We’re at the point in the season that these onions were just about fully cured to the point that they could have been kept in the pantry…..however I trimmed them a bit. In an effort to trim the roots and remove some of the dirtier outer layers of skin I’ve exposed the less fully cured […]

Astro Arugula

I love how peppery this arugula is. On a sandwich, in an omelet, or as a simple salad, it is delightful. If you don’t like the spicy zesty-ness of raw radish, you might not like raw arugula as much. In that case, try roughly chopping and sautéing it with some leek. I’m a little torn […]

Greenhouse Celery

In the last share you all got celery root, now here is some celery. Greenhouse grown celery is usually a little nicer than field celery for eating as less exposure to sunlight means less chlorophyll development and a less bitter celery.

Leek

Nichols referred to this a ‘Biker’ Leek, and in my due diligence, I typically research any particularly named variety. In that effort, I occasionally come across some pretty fun descriptions/reviews. Here is one from seedway.com on biker leeks: This summer leek features a very straight long shaft and remarkably erect leaves that make it easy to […]

Italian Eggplant

The last eggplant of the season, these are some nice smaller ones.

Honey Crisp and 20 Ounce Apples

We received honey crisps a couple of shares back, but we won’t complain. 20 Ounce Apples are named such because they can grow to be monstrously big. With a nice level of tartness and flavor similar to Granny Smiths, 20 Ounce Apples first appeared in 1843, supposedly discovered natively growing in upstate New York.

Delicata Squash

These are some of the biggest delicatas we’ve ever seen. With a thin edible skin, you often see them sliced and roasted as pretty rings. Being so big, these would do well cubed and roasted (or anyway you’d do any other winter squash).

Bayou Belle and Covington Sweet Potatoes

In order to store well, sweet potatoes are cured after harvest. After spending 10 days at 85-90 degrees, the sweet potatoes will keep at 60 degrees until spring, which is good because Nichols Farm harvested over 30,000lbs (!!) this season. The Bayou Belles are the purplish-red, ones, while the Covingtons have brick orange skin.

Leek

A lot of leek to close out the season, but we like that though. Besides cleaning leeks (but that’s what you have Gard Mo for), they’re easy to use and add a nice mellow oniony-ness to any dish.

Baby Bok Choi

The smaller leaves of baby bok choi makes it nice for use whole, either quickly boiled, steamed, or roasted. Or just chop it and add to a veggie stir fry.

Brussels Sprouts

The sprouts are starting to get larger further into the season. If you’re looking for something different, try making a slaw, thinly slicing the brussels sprouts in place of cabbage.

Greenhouse Celery

Celery is often described as having no flavor, but that’s just not true. It has a very distinctive flavor that most people would recognize as celery, but it’s just subtle. That aroma is due to less common compounds called phthalides in combination with the ever-common terpenes (piney, citrus, etc.).

Red Onion

Similar to last share, I trimmed these a bit to remove the roots and the dirtier outer layers of skin, but that exposed the less fully-cured layers so store these in the crisper box in the refrigerator and they will last quite a while.

Purple Daikon Radish

These are some large radishes. You’ll often see daikons pickled in Korean cuisine, and these would be very pretty prepared that way. Otherwise, they do well roasted or sautéed.

Parsley

Parsley can be polarizing, but I promise this flat leaf Italian parsley is much nicer than the curly parsley that finds its way onto plates. Throw into any dish for a bit of brightness.

Corn Cob Stock

You could call this ‘essence of corn’. As we cut all the corn off the cob for you all throughout the season, we held on to the cobs so that we could make this corn cob stock. The flavor is intense and pretty sweet, so consider diluting with some water to use. Corn Cob Stock […]

Pickled Cherry Tomatoes

These cherry tomatoes actually came from my Dad’s garden in Geneva, IL. He planted some cherry tomatoes a few years back, and now they just come back every year and are without a doubt the most productive tomato plants I’ve ever seen.  We pickled them with sherry vinegar and dill seed. Toss in a salad, […]

Empire and Rome Apples

We’ve got a little bit of theme with the apples this share, so if you haven’t thought about the Roman Empire recently, you’re welcome. Empire Apples are named so because they developed at Cornell University. A cross between McIntosh and Red Delicious. Aromatic with nice sweet/tart balance, Empires are great snacking apples. Rome Apples are […]

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti Squash is named such because of the way the the flesh breaks apart when cooked. You’ll often see it in recipes replacing pasta but I think it stands alone pretty well with just some butter. Halved and roasted is a sure-fire way to cook it, but if you’re in a rush microwaving it works […]

Leek

We really like leek because of how easy it is to use. We cut it down to manageable size pieces so all that you have to do is give it a quick slice and throw in with whatever other veggies you’re cooking.

Fall Spinach

Spinach in the shares this week was a happy accident of the whacky weather recently. We had initially planed for some bok choi, but the cold weather this week killed off the tender crops at the farm. However, hardy crops like spinach, actually get sweeter as the cold nights set in so we get to […]

Candy Onion

We’re at the point in the season that these onions were just about fully cured to the point that they could have been kept in the pantry…..however I trimmed them a bit. In an effort to trim the roots and remove some of the dirtier outer layers of skin I’ve exposed the less fully cured […]

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are one of the more time consuming things for us to prep. We trim the woody ends, and remove the outer dark green leaves. We do that for two reasons. One is that there is often some bad leaves just under those couple tops leaves, and without going through them all you end […]

Greenhouse Celery

Celery is often described as having no flavor, but that’s just not true. It has a very distinctive flavor that most people would recognize as celery, but it’s just subtle. That aroma is due to less common compounds called phthalides in combination with the ever-common terpenes (piney, citrus, etc.).

Celery Leaf

A while back, we mentioned that we we’re including celery leaves in the share. But I (Ben), in a let’s-get-this-done stupor, put all of those leaves into the freezer forgetting that we promised them to you all. Well here are some from the celery in the share this week. Add as a garnish to about […]

Japanese Sweet Potatoes

Japanese sweet potato from the outside look like the Carolina Rubies that we had a few shares back, but their flesh is a pale white. Fluffy, and sweet these are pretty tasty just baked, or use anywhere you would another sweet potato.